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How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill

How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill

Building Retaining Wall Step-Ups into the Slope If you are building with AB Fieldstone retaining wall system, go to AB Fieldstone installation For AB, AB Aztec & AB Europa Walls Compact and level wall rock Excavate and compact next step-up Compact and level wall rock Install retaining wall step-up When building step-ups, begin the base course at the lowest wall elevation. Dig a base trench that is 24 in. (600 mm) wide.** The depth of the trench is determined by allowing for 6 in. (150 mm) plus an additional 1 in. (25mm) for each 1 ft. (300 mm) of wall height for the amount or buried block that is needed. The trench also needs to extend into the slope far enough to bury one full block.** If a slope is present below the wall, contact a local engineer for assistance. Compact and level the base trench making a minimum of two passes with a plate compactor. Video: How to build a retaining wall up a slope Place the drain pipe at the lowest possible point toward the back of the trench. Place a minimum of 6 in. (150 mm) of wall rock in the base trench and check for level. Compact the base material, making a minimum of two passes with a plate compactor. Excavate the second step up making sure to accommodate for the base material and buried block. Compact and level the step-up area. Place the base course of blocks on the base material and check for level. Fill the hollow cores and 12 in. (300 mm) behind the block as well as the base area of the next step up with wall rock then backfill with infill or approved on-site soils. Make sure that the blocks and the base of the next step-up are level. Step-up retaining wall into slope Compact the wall rock directly behind the block and the next step-up area a minimum of two passes with a plate compactor. Repeat these steps to the top of the grade. Keep in mind the block at each step-up must be completely buried to maintain the proper base depth and to prevent wall failure due to erosion. **For walls under 4 ft. (1.2 m) dig the base trench 18 in. wide (460 mm) and 4 in. deep (100 mm) plus additional to account for the amount of buried block needed. For AB Fieldstone Walls Install step up with fieldstone 824 assembly Backfill with wall rock compact retaining wall for next step up Continue to top of slope Building Step-Ups with AB Fieldstone 824 Assembly Step-ups are most stable when the upper block has sufficient bearing on the lower block. The length of the 824 assembly (if available) provides the flexibility to make this block ideal for this application. If using the 812 assembly, use the instructions listed above. Build the wall up to the step-up location. Excavate for next step up. Install wall rock, level and compact. Compaction of the base material where the step-up will be installed is very important to ensure the wall does not settle. Make a minimum of 2 passes with a plate compactor. Create the step-up by placing an AB Fieldstone 824 assembly so it is installed on at least 6 in. (150 mm) of the block below and spans out onto the base material creating the next course. Install an AB Fieldstone 812 assembly next to the 824 assembly to complete the step up. Fill the hollow cores and 12in. (300 mm) behind the block as well as the base area of the next step up with wall rock then backfill with infill or approved on-site soils. Make sure that the blocks and the base of the next step-up are level. Step-up retaining wall into slope with 824 assembly Compact the wall rock directly behind the block and the next step up area a minimum of two passes with a plate compactor. Repeat these steps to the top of the grade. Keep in mind the block at each step-up must be completely buried to maintain the proper base depth and to prevent wall failure due to erosion.

How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill

Tools & Materials Tools Shovel Circular Saw Masonry Circular Saw Blade Chisel Drilling Hammer Rubber Mallet Speed Square Tape Measure Levels Hand Tamper Caulk Gun Garden Rake Brush Work Gloves Safety Glasses Hearing Protection Respirator / Dust Mask Back Support Materials Interlocking Retaining Wall Blocks Landscape Fabric Gravel / Drainage Aggregate Construction Adhesive Paver Base Mason Line Landscape Stakes Marking Paint Garden Soil Retaining Wall Caps (Optional) Hose (Optional) Rope (Optional) Product costs, availability and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Planning the Retaining Wall The blocks for this project have a locking flange — which makes the installation easy. The interlocking blocks can be used to build walls up to 28 inches high. Follow the block manufacturer’s instructions concerning wall height limits. Plan your layout. Avoid having downspouts pointed at the retaining wall and, if it’s against the house, keep soil and mulch well below the siding. Your retaining wall design will determine how you mark the area. To mark a freeform layout, use a rope or hose to outline the shape. Then use a shovel to mark the outline. For straight lines, mark the entire bed area with stakes, string and marking paint. Mark curved corners by tying a string to a stake that’s equidistant to the edge — creating a compass — and spraying the curves with marking paint. To determine how many blocks you’ll need per row, divide the total length of the wall by the length of the block. To see how many rows you’ll need, divide the ideal wall height by the height of the block — account for the first row to be half-buried. See Planning for a Block Retaining Wall for more information on estimating project materials. Before you buy materials or begin work, check local building codes and your homeowner’s association regulations to see if there are any restrictions or requirements you need to follow. A permit may be mandatory in some areas. Good to KnowBlocks can be heavy — wear a back support if necessary. You may want to enlist a helper to share the work. Consider having the material delivered. Good to KnowPurchase 10% more blocks than your estimate. The excess should account for breakage, cutting blocks and replacements for future repairs. Instructions Preparing the Foundation Step 1 With the layout marked, you can begin digging the trench. To bury the first row about halfway, dig the trench about 4 to 6 inches deep and 12 inches wide, or twice the width of the block. CautionBefore beginning any excavation, call 811 to check for underground utilities. Step 2 If the trench slopes, you’ll have to step up or down to keep the blocks level. Use a torpedo level to create steps so that each section of the wall remains level. You do not want the wall to run parallel to the slope. Step 3 Tamp down the dirt with a hand tamper and keep it level. Step 4 Fill the trench with about 3 inches of paver base, spread it with a rake, and tamp it down. Tamping the base provides a strong foundation. When it’s all level, you can begin installing the blocks. Good to KnowWet the paver base if it’s dry and dusty. Building the Retaining Wall Step 1 For row one, knock off the flanges with a hammer and chisel so the blocks will sit flat. CautionWear safety glasses and work gloves when using a chisel on the blocks. Step 2 Beginning at the end with the lowest elevation, set the first block in place and check for level side-to-side and front-to-back. Step 3 Place the next block, making sure it’s even with the first. Continue installing the first row, periodically checking for level. Good to KnowA 6- to 9-inch torpedo level is useful for checking level of individual blocks or checking level front to back. A longer carpenter’s or mason’s level — 24 inches and up — is good for checking level over several blocks. Step 4 To level the rows and keep the blocks even, fill in under low blocks with paver base or tap down high blocks with a rubber mallet. Step 5 After installing each row, sweep dirt off the tops. Step 6 To start the second row you’ll have to cut a block to stagger the joints. Mark it, and cut it with a masonry blade. CautionWear safety glasses, hearing protection and a safety mask / respirator when cutting block. Follow the saw and blade manufacturers’ instructions for use and safety. Step 7 Put the cut block in place, keeping the flange tight against the first row. Check it for level. Step 8 After installing the next few rows, you’ll need to add drainage directly behind the blocks. Lay down landscape fabric behind the wall, leaving enough excess to reach the top of the blocks. Step 9 Fill in directly behind the wall with gravel, then continue to build, by adding more rows. Step 10 For the last two rows of full blocks, apply concrete adhesive to the wall block tops, then set the next row of blocks in place. Good to KnowIf you’re adding block caps, apply adhesive to the top row of block before placing the caps. Step 11 Fold the excess fabric back and fill in with soil and plants.

How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill

How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill
How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill
How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill
How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill
How To Build A Retaining Wall On A Hill

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