0

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

How should I landscape my front yard?Your front yard is the first impression many people will have of your house, so when planning your tropical garden design, think about kerb appeal above all else, and make sure it is consistent with the style of your home. A well-maintained fence and, in some cases, something to walk under, like a pergola, can add a sense of arrival; while a wide, easy-to-walk-on pathway will help guests navigate your yard. Garden edging and neatly trimmed hedges will imply you take care of your home, and a special feature near the entrance, such as a large planter, sculpture or water fountain, will add personality and give guests a reason to stop and smell the roses. How should I landscape my backyard?A backyard is intended for relaxing, entertaining and playtime, so don’t opt for a typical lawn and patio just because everyone else is. Consider allocating areas of your backyard for activities such as dining and barbecues, reading a book and playing with the kids. Dividing your backyard up into areas will help you get more from the space. A vegetable garden or rose garden is a popular backyard staple, but you can turn it up a notch with interesting elements such as a pergola, arbour or raised garden bed. Also consider the seasons. A pool or spa is great for the summer, but keep it interesting, even when it gets cold, with the likes of a fire pit or outdoor fireplace. Finish it off with weather-proof outdoor furniture so your tropical backyard acts as an extension to your home. How do I create a low-maintenance garden?You may not be horticulturally inclined, or perhaps you don’t have time for landscape gardening – either way, you’ll be glad to know that not all gardens require a green thumb. In fact, some of the best tropical garden designs require very little maintenance at all – and they don’t have to include a large slab of pavement, either. In low-maintenance garden designs, hard landscaping – gravel, paving and decking – is best used in favour of grass, and is especially suitable for entertaining zones. Grasses do, however, require varying degrees of maintenance, so speak to a professional for his or her advice on which works best for your needs. Otherwise, there’s also the option of artificial grass. You might prefer a little patch of wilderness; something that looks more natural, in which case, there are plenty of native grasses, plants and flowers that can achieve this effect and require little care. Any labour-intense features such as vegetable gardens, greenhouses and flower beds can be maintained with an automatic irrigation system.
tropical garden design sydney 1

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

When Greg and partner Nicki have a drink on their deck on a balmy summer evening, the ambience is that of a tropical resort, achieved with mature foliage, subtle lighting and a host of clever ideas. The couple relocated from Sydney in 2012 in search of a sea change, swapping an apartment balcony for a courtyard. When they arrived, the garden was non-existent, says Greg. “It was just Colorbond fences, a strip of deck and some pebbles. I used to plan, sketch and dream about what it could be on the train when I was commuting to Sydney for work. I’ve never had a garden of my own and was itching to get my hands dirty.”
tropical garden design sydney 2

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

All Rooms / Outdoor Photos / Garden / Tropical clear all 12,718 Tropical Garden Design Photos Landscaping not only impacts kerb appeal, but can also affect your lifestyle and how much you enjoy your home. A well-manicured lawn and attractive garden bed, for instance, encourages you to step outside and enjoy what’s on offer, adding yet another dimension to your home. Use the garden photos on Houzz to see how homeowners have used plants, paving, decking and outdoor structures to make the most of their tropical gardens, and create an outdoor oasis of your own. More Popular Today Latest Activity All Time Popular Newly Featured 1 – 8 of 12,718 photos
tropical garden design sydney 3

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

The couple relocated from Sydney in 2012 in search of a sea change, swapping an apartment balcony for a courtyard. When they arrived, the garden was non-existent, says Greg. “It was just Colorbond fences, a strip of deck and some pebbles. I used to plan, sketch and dream about what it could be on the train when I was commuting to Sydney for work. I’ve never had a garden of my own and was itching to get my hands dirty.”
tropical garden design sydney 4

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

The space between the back of the pool and boundary fence threatened to become a dead area in this Sydney home. Instead, designer Peter Fudge has turned it into a densely planted ‘secret’ garden, bisected by a rustic path of partially dressed railway sleepers. A sculpture provides a focal point at the end of the path, which leads at right angles from the gravel-floored sunken lounge area of the garden, drawing visitors through. This area, with its fire pit and pod chairs, looks back toward the house. The side garden though offers an alternative view. Its planting echoes the larger garden with a naturalistic blend of exotics and natives. Grevillea, gymea lily and psyllid-resistant lilly pilly, along the back boundary, are matched with eupatorium to create a mixed planting of foliage colour and texture. A Japanese maple in the corner provides a splash of red.
tropical garden design sydney 5

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

The focus in this Sydney garden is its view of the harbour. Designer Peter Fudge ensured that it was emphasised from all points of the outdoor area, including the side of the property. The path shown here leads to a bench that takes in the incredible scenery. The path itself links visually to the rest of the garden, with a tough natural look achieved through a blend of authentic natives and hardy exotics. Trimmed into ‘buns’ along a flagging stone path are westringia and Pittosporum tobira ‘Miss Muffet’. At the end of the path, the clipped shapes give way to the softness of willowy Agonis flexuosa ‘After Dark’, which is used in groves throughout the garden, and Lomandra ‘Tanika’. Foliage colour and textural contrasts are the key here, says Peter, with occasional flowers a bonus.
tropical garden design sydney 6

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

Gardening in tropical and subtropical areas requires a different approach to gardening in a temperate climate. Tropical gardeners rarely have to dig down to plant, instead they layer the soil with compost, leaf mould, garden clippings and mulch. Leaf mulch layering is a process that occurs naturally in forests and gullies, where soil fertility resides in just the top few inches.
tropical garden design sydney 7

Tropical Garden Design Sydney

Sydney designer Matthew Cantwell of Secret Gardens thinks knocking on the front door is for formal visits. When people come over, he says, it’s much friendlier to be able to tell them to come straight around the back. However, for that to happen there needs to be a welcoming path that links the front with the rear. Here, concrete pavers from Eco Outdoor in a sea of dichondra make a defined but soft connecting path from the front gate out into the back entrance. On the northern side, where the property is overlooked by the neighbours’ house, slender weaver bamboo and Strelitzia nicolai (bird of paradise) offer privacy within a garden bed that is only 1.5 metres wide. At ground level, bromeliads offer year-round colour, augmented by seasonal colour splashes from Heliconia ‘Christmas Cheer’ and Brazilian walking iris.
tropical garden design sydney 8

For the most part, tropical gardens rely on foliage rather than flowers to create interest year round. Foliage should be flamboyant, lively and colourful, and plants must be chosen on the basis of the size, shape and texture of their leaves. Planting in groups of odd numbers (three, five, seven and nine) is a common trick employed by garden designers — it gives a broad brushstroke of colour and texture, and makes a huge difference to the feel of the garden. Placing plants with contrasting foliage next to each other will create drama and interest.
tropical garden design sydney 9

A selection of perfectly placed palms and bamboo is essential for achieving a tropical look. Although they’re often criticised for growing too big or escaping, palms and bamboo will benefit the style and mood of the garden — they provide the rustle of foliage in the wind, furnish your garden with a fern-like ceiling and dense green walls, and do a great job of privacy screening. There are a million varieties to choose from, so visit a specialist palm or bamboo nursery where you can seek expert advice. Remember that not all varieties are suited to every climate, and smaller-growing or dwarf specimens are the best choice for courtyards and pocket-sized gardens.
tropical garden design sydney 10

If you love to cook, try growing Asian herbs and spices in your tropical garden. Not only do they contribute wonderful flavours and aromas to a wide variety of dishes, they smell fantastic in the garden and help deter pests.
tropical garden design sydney 11

Landscaping not only impacts kerb appeal, but can also affect your lifestyle and how much you enjoy your home. A well-manicured lawn and attractive garden bed, for instance, encourages you to step outside and enjoy what’s on offer, adding yet another dimension to your home. Use the garden photos on Houzz to see how homeowners have used plants, paving, decking and outdoor structures to make the most of their tropical gardens, and create an outdoor oasis of your own. More

You can download all 11 of Tropical Garden Design Sydney photo to your laptop by right clicking photo and then save image as. Do not forget to click share if you like with this picture.